You are here

Clinical Practice

 

Scientists from NUST MISIS have developed “living bandages” created from nanofibers that are capable of accelerating the regeneration of damaged tissue. Findings are published in Applied Surface Science.

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed and tested an organ-on-a-chip showing how pathogens like hepatitis B interact with artificial human organs. Findings were published in Nature Communications.

Researchers have developed a list of recommended changes to international guidelines for the development of clinical trials to gain insights on the impact of treatment on participants and their quality of life. Finding were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Health) have found using a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD) with additional staff education could reduce contaminated blood cultures by four-fold.

Remote patient monitoring may not improve a half-dozen clinical outcomes, according to a study published in Nature Digital Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

ISDD reduces contaminated blood cultures, costs

Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Health) have found using a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD) with additional staff education could reduce contaminated blood cultures by four-fold.

Biosensor tracks glucose levels in real-time through tears, sweat

Researchers have developed a biosensor capable of monitoring blood glucose levels through the wearer's sweat and tears, according to a study published in ACS Nano.

Remote patient monitoring fails to improve 6 clinical outcomes

Remote patient monitoring may not improve a half-dozen clinical outcomes, according to a study published in Nature Digital Medicine.

5 recommendations for fatigue management in EMS personnel

Scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a set of guidelines to combat fatigue in emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in order to reduce medical errors and risk of injury.

Type 2 diabetes skin patch controls blood sugar levels in mice

Researchers at the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in Bethesda, Maryland, have developed a biochemical formula using mineralized compounds capable of regulating the blood sugar of type 2 diabetes for multiple days in mice. Findings are published in Nature Communications.

3D-printing technique produces soft structures for tissue regeneration

Researchers from the Imperial College London have developed a 3D-printing technique, paired with cryogenics, capable of recreating biological structures for tissue regeneration and producing replica organs. Findings are published in Scientific Reports.

Scientists develop wearable system of artificial muscles

Researchers led by Minoru Hashimoto, a professor of textile science and technology at Shinshu University in Japan, have developed a wearable robot capable of supporting the hip joint while a patient is walking. The prototype design, which is described as a wearable actuator, is described in an article published in Smart Materials and Structures.

Researchers make 2 discoveries as ingestible capsule finishes human trials

Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have completed the first human trials using a gas-sensing swallowable capsule. The team made two separate discoveries that could improve research into gastrointestinal disorders. Findings are published in Nature Electronics.

Algorithm reduces side effects of radiation therapy, sustains standard of care

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed an algorithm for cancer patients receiving radiotherapy that could reduce side effects while maintaining efficacy. Findings were published in Physics in Medicine & Biology.

Gamification of physiotherapy could improve patient outcomes

Patients who played gamified versions of rehabilitation exercises experienced high levels of enjoyment while achieving improved functional performance, according to a study published in JMIR Serious Games.

Pages