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Clinical Practice

 

The University of California, Irvine was award $8 million to head a group that will develop a brain-computer interface that can restore walking ability and sensation in individuals with a spinal cord injury.

Engineers from Brigham Young University have developed a 'smartfoam' capable of detecting a sport-caused concussion in real time.

Researchers from the State University of New York at Binghamton have developed a non-invasive paper-based sensor patch, capable of measuring blood glucose levels for diabetic patients.

Researchers from the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom have developed a genetically engineered common molecule capable of being programmed to fight cancer, influenza and other diseases.

Researchers from the University of Houston have developed an artificial skin, capable of stretching over robotic hands and sense the difference between hot and cold. Findings are published in Science Advances.

 

Recent Headlines

Brain-computer interface, virtual avatar promote movement in brain

Researchers from the University of Houston have completed a study using a brain-computer interface paired with a virtual avatar to control gait to assist patients recovering the ability to walk after a stroke and other impairments. The study, published in Scientific Reports, aimed to further development of brain-computer interfaces.

Near-infrared light identifies patients at risk for heart attack, stroke

Identifying high-risk heart attack and stroke patients allows physicians to administer early treatment to prevent serious events, but current methods are unable to pinpoint some symptoms. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers outlined how near-infrared light can identify high-risk arterial plaques.

3D-printing method produces living tissue for regenerative medicine

Researchers from the University of Oxford have developed a new 3D-printing method to improve how laboratory-grown cells form living structures. Explained in Scientific Reports, the new method aims to change regenerative medicine by producing complex tissues and cartilage capable of supporting or repairing damaged areas in the body.

Intensified oral therapies may lower lipid levels; simulation shows gap between guidelines, actual practice

Controlling lipid levels in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) can be improved with oral-only lipid lowering treatments, according to new research. A simulation study showed that 99.3 percent of patients could achieve low-density lipid (LDL) levels below 70 mg/dL with maximal intensification.

Researchers utilize 3D printing to produce “lab on chip” devices

Microfluidic “lab on a chip” devices and 3D printing are being paired together by researchers at Brigham Young University. The team wanted to improve the effectiveness of such devices, which can be less than 100 micrometers. A report from Lab on a Chip outlined how the technology can better identify disease biomarkers.

Robots improve postop outcomes after esophageal surgery

Robotic surgeries could be the way of the future according to researchers at Allina Health. In a recent study published in Diseases of the Esophagus, researchers tested the safety and effectiveness of robotic assisted transhiatal esophagectomy (RATE) on patients.

Nanotechnology test identifies Zika in minutes

Detecting Zika currently requires blood samples to be refrigerated and shipped to a laboratory for tests, delaying treatment and care to those in rural areas. Researchers from Washington University published a study in Advanced Biosystems that details a new technology capable of delivering Zika test results in minutes.

Smartphone spectrometer detects diseases as accurately as lab equipment

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have utilized smartphone technology to develop a spectral transmission-reflectance-intensity (TRI) analyzer. The technology attaches to a smartphone and can analyze samples of blood, urine and saliva just as well as clinical instruments.

Video games can reduce gray matter in hippocampus

Playing video game can reduce the amount of gray matter in the hippocampus region of the brain by using spatial learning, navigation and memory. In a study published in Molecular Psychiatry, researchers evaluated which types of games affect the brain.

Device repurposes cells, healing organs without additional treatment

Described in the recent issue of Nature Nanotechnology, a technology called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT) technology has shown an ability to transform skin cells into other types of cells with 98 percent accuracy, with the potential ability to save failing organs.

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