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Clinical Practice

 

Scientists from NUST MISIS have developed “living bandages” created from nanofibers that are capable of accelerating the regeneration of damaged tissue. Findings are published in Applied Surface Science.

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed and tested an organ-on-a-chip showing how pathogens like hepatitis B interact with artificial human organs. Findings were published in Nature Communications.

Researchers have developed a list of recommended changes to international guidelines for the development of clinical trials to gain insights on the impact of treatment on participants and their quality of life. Finding were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Health) have found using a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD) with additional staff education could reduce contaminated blood cultures by four-fold.

Remote patient monitoring may not improve a half-dozen clinical outcomes, according to a study published in Nature Digital Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

Protein discovery could treat obesity, diabetes

Researchers, led by Suresh Alahari, PhD, Fred Brazda Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, have brought the fight against obesity and diabetes to the cellular level with a study outlining the potential of the Nischarin protein.

Robot evaluates brain cells faster, more accurately

Researchers, led by Simon Schultz and Luca Annecchino at Imperial College London, have developed a new method of whole-cell recording (WCR) to record electrical currents in the brain.

Brain-computer interface improves motor function in stroke patients

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have developed a brain-computer interface (BCI) capable of improving motor function in stroke patients. Findings were published in Royal Society Open Science.

Novartis launches study using smartphone app on MS

Novartis, producers of innovative healthcare solutions, has announced the launch of its elevateMS study. The study aims to utilize a mobile application for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to collect sensor-based data to improve research.

3D AR improved facial reconstructive results

Plastic surgery researchers have utilized augmented reality (AR) to create 3D simulations in facial reconstructive surgery. The study, published in the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery-Global Open, examined the benefits of using the AR system during plastic surgery.

Brain-computer interface, virtual avatar promote movement in brain

Researchers from the University of Houston have completed a study using a brain-computer interface paired with a virtual avatar to control gait to assist patients recovering the ability to walk after a stroke and other impairments. The study, published in Scientific Reports, aimed to further development of brain-computer interfaces.

Near-infrared light identifies patients at risk for heart attack, stroke

Identifying high-risk heart attack and stroke patients allows physicians to administer early treatment to prevent serious events, but current methods are unable to pinpoint some symptoms. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers outlined how near-infrared light can identify high-risk arterial plaques.

3D-printing method produces living tissue for regenerative medicine

Researchers from the University of Oxford have developed a new 3D-printing method to improve how laboratory-grown cells form living structures. Explained in Scientific Reports, the new method aims to change regenerative medicine by producing complex tissues and cartilage capable of supporting or repairing damaged areas in the body.

Intensified oral therapies may lower lipid levels; simulation shows gap between guidelines, actual practice

Controlling lipid levels in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) can be improved with oral-only lipid lowering treatments, according to new research. A simulation study showed that 99.3 percent of patients could achieve low-density lipid (LDL) levels below 70 mg/dL with maximal intensification.

Researchers utilize 3D printing to produce “lab on chip” devices

Microfluidic “lab on a chip” devices and 3D printing are being paired together by researchers at Brigham Young University. The team wanted to improve the effectiveness of such devices, which can be less than 100 micrometers. A report from Lab on a Chip outlined how the technology can better identify disease biomarkers.

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