You are here

Mobile & Telehealth

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a remote feature allowing programming sessions given through telehealth platforms to patients who have had at least six months of experience with their cochlear implant sound processor.

Researchers from Brigham Young University have found mental health mobile applications to be feasible self-help tools for improving mental or emotional health, according to a study published in JMIR mHealth.

A multiplayer mobile game that puts physically impaired patients with able-bodied individuals has shown to improve rehabilitation, according to a study published in the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation.

According to a study conducted by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and published in JAMA Dermatology, parents that send high-quality photos from a smartphone camera of their child’s skin condition to dermatologists could skip the office visits and receive treatment through telehealth.

A mobile application assisting patients with macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy in testing their vision is just as accurate in providing results as in-person office visits, according to a study presented at the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Recent Headlines

Virtual visits as effective as in-person appointments for Parkinson’s patients

Virtual visits by neurologists save patients the hassle of travel, but some question such remote meetings as effective as in-person visits. A study published in Neurology examined the feasibility of virtual house calls by neurologist in treating those with Parkinson’s disease.

E-visits increase appointments made, reduce new patients seen

E-visits allow for patients and providers to come together without the travel or waiting room times, but whether these visits are as effective or have other benefits is unknown. In a study conducted by the Wisconsin School of Business, researchers found e-visits promote more appointments to primary care physicians.

Smartphone app improves concussion outcomes in teens

Smartphones and teenagers go hand-in-hand, but in the event of a concussion, patients are not advised to use mobile devices. In a report published in Brain Injury, researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center showed teenagers using a mobile health application once a day with medical care improved concussion symptoms.

Smartphone app helps elderly manage mental health

A new smartphone application could improve personalized care and outcomes, according to a study published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. The new app combined medical and psychiatric self-management care directed at patients with serious mental illness to keep them engaged in their own care and improve outcomes.

Online games help diabetic patients control blood glucose

Playing online team games can help diabetes patients lower their blood glucose levels, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.

96% of employers set to offer telehealth services in 2018

With healthcare costs expected to increase 5 percent in the next year, providers are looking for more effective ways to deliver care, including telehealth. According to the Large Employers’ 2018 Health Care Strategy and Plan Design Survey by the National Business Group on Health, 96 percent of employers are set to offer telehealth services.

ATA begins search for new CEO after Jonathan Linkous steps down

The American Telemedicine Association will see a new CEO soon with Jon Linkous stepping down. After 24 years as the CEO, Linkous will be replaced by Sabrina Smith, MD, acting as interim CEO until a permanent replacement is found.

mHealth app for rural women lowers risk of low birth weight, improves prenatal outcomes

In a study published in Telemedicine and e-Health, researchers tested the effectiveness of mobile health applications to improve early and ongoing prenatal care through engagement.

'Smart' clothing reduces back stress, pain

Engineers at Vanderbilt University have developed smart clothing, a wearable that utilizes biomechanics and technology to create a smart mechanical undergarment.

Wearable biofeedback system improves balance in Parkinson’s patients

Researchers at the University of Houston in the Department of Health and Human Performance are hoping to improve quality of life for Parkinson’s patients with a wearable belt connected to a smartphone application to help users regain balance.

Pages