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Privacy & Security

 

Siemens and eight partners to sign a joint charter to improve cybersecurity, identifying 10 action areas where governments and business could engage in the growth of security.

Medical devices, including cardioverter defibrillators and pacemakers, could be at risk to hacking and potential cause life-threatening events, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Out of all types of healthcare providers, hospitals accounted for one-third of all data breaches and affected the largest number of individuals compared to doctors, nurses and social workers, according to a study published in The American Journal of Managed Care.

A receiver for Filefax has agreed to pay $100,000 from its liquidated estate to the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) after being found in violation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule.

At least 50 percent of physicians are scored in the “risk” category, meaning their actions put their organization at risk for a serious privacy or security incident, according to the 2017 State of Privacy and Security Awareness Report.

 

Recent Headlines

83% of US physicians have experienced a cyberattack

According to a study released by Accenture and the American Medical Association (AMA), 83 percent of American physicians have experienced some form of a cybersecurity breach.

Privacy remains top barrier to patients sharing EMRs

Privacy concerns are the main barrier in getting patients to share electronic medical records (EMRs) with healthcare providers, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

House Committee urges HHS to improve security on medical devices

In a letter written to HHS Acting Secretary Eric D. Hagan, House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walde, R-Oregon, urged the agency to develop a sector-wide plan of action in deploying a “bill of materials” (BOM) for healthcare technology.

Ransomware tops list of 10 health technology hazards

Healthcare technology, while providing patients and professionals with advanced care solutions, has weaknesses in protecting patient information, according to the Top 10 Health Technology Hazards for 2018 report conducted by ECRI Institute.

Healthcare interest in blockchain grows

Blockchain solutions have piqued interest of the healthcare industry, positioning the technology as a fix to interoperability, privacy and security issues. A report conducted by Black Book presented current and planned measures in the implementation of blockchain.

73% of physicians share EMR passwords

Maintaining a high level of security in electronic medical records (EMRs) requires physicians have unique user IDs and passwords, but, according to a study published in Health Informatics Research, 73.6 percent of physicians have received the password of another staff member.

Lock and key: Heart scan offers improved cybersecurity

Researchers from the University of Buffalo have developed a computer security system that uses the dimensions of users' heart as their log-in.

Photo, video sharing app complies with regulations to protect patient data

Researchers are developing platforms to securely and quickly send data to and from smartphones. A new mobile application developed to assist providers in meeting patient privacy regulation allows for the sharing and storing of patient-related photos, videos and audio.

Mobile apps for dementia patients lack security measures

The lack of cybersecurity in mobile applications meant to assist dementia patients and their caregivers could put patients' personal health information at risk, according to researchers at McLean Hospitals in Belmont, Massachusetts, and clinicians at Harvard Medical School. A study in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry examined app security policies and provided recommendations.

Cyberattacks on 3D printers result in defective products

Cyberattacks occur on many types of devices—including 3D printers. A new study, conducted by researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Georgia Institute of Technology, examines methods in protecting 3D printers for improved cybersecurity.

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